The Question Matters


Are You Willing to Work So That You Can Work to Live?

 

Texas Rangers (baseball)

It's Time.

 

I am the master of my schedule.  If an opportunity to spend some extra time with my family comes up, I will often take it.  If the Texas Rangers are playing (hopefully for a while longer) I’ll cut off work a little early to make sure I can catch the game on TV.  If I’m behind on paperwork at home, no big deal.  I’ll just get that done before I start with my work for the day.  Need a long lunch?  OK, I’m not on the clock.  I’ll take an extra 15 minutes and watch a favorite show on DVR.

My work is too often the master of my time.  If the iPhone is in my pocket, I’m always tempted to pick it up even at family activities.  If I’m watching that Texas Rangers game, it may be with my MacBook in my lap dong a little busy work that didn’t get done.  Did I take a longer lunch?  That probably means I’ll close up shop at 10 that night instead of 9:30.

The notion that we can work to live, not live to work is monumental mental shift.  It may be the biggest shift in workforce dynamics since the labor unions a century ago.  In that time, workers stood up for their rights to a decent wage, vacation time, respect in the workplace, and legal force they did not have alone.  Today, workers are standing up for their rights to choose the times they’ll work, how they do that work, and where they do that work.

James Townsend:

For those of us in Generation X and those in the Baby Boomer generation, we’ve been known to say we “live to work” and often connect our self-identification with our job/occupation.  For those in the Millennial generation, they “work to live” and value time with friends, family over time spent at work.  This generation is more likely to tell their boss when they plan to come to work and when they plan to leave, as there are important things to do outside of work – yoga, exercise, movies, etc…Balancing work and life is vitally important to this generation but not as much for the current generation of office managers and organizational leaders.  The challenge for the Millennial employee is understanding and respecting the structure of the organization

I want that balance in my work life, too.  As a business coach with a passion for younger entrepreneurs, I want them to achieve that balance.  And it must be achieved. It won’t happen by brute force or unreasonable demands.  If the under-30 workforce wants work/life balance, it will have to be earned, either by the slow but steady change of large organizations or by the re-invention of the workplace on your own terms, in your own business.

Either way will require a lot of work.

Handshakes are Making a Comeback

Red Chuck Taylor All Star basketball shoe.

Image via Wikipedia

Retro is what’s next.  When my parents saw me wearing tight jeans in middle school, asking for Converse high tops, and listening to the Beach Boys sing “Kokomo,” their comment was predictable:  “Everything comes back in style eventually.”  Sure, Mom and Dad.

Not long ago, my five-year-old son asked for his first Transformer.  I caught myself wondering why I didn’t save the 50 or so Transformers I had when I was in elementary school.  Then, as if my parents had pre-programmed me to say it, out came, “Everything comes back in style, eventually.”

In a previous post, I introduced you to James Townsend who works in the Admissions office of LeTourneau University in Longview, TX.  In my conversation with JT,  I was struck by a comment he made regarding effective recruitment of Millennials.  Part one didn’t surprise me:

Ten years ago the students thought sending email was cool and chatted with one another via instant messenger.  They still enjoyed visiting with college admissions counselors by phone and receiving college brochures in the mail.  Over the past ten years that changed dramatically – email is only for business type communication, few of them use instant messaging – preferring to text or chat and post on Facebook instead.  Most of the college material received in the mail still went in a big box under the bed and [they questioned] why the college would waste so much money and kill so many trees to send so much unsolicited mail out.

Makes sense.  But JT makes an observation that surprised me.  Perhaps it will surprise you, too:

The trend we are noticing for 2011 is that students are coming full circle and now want personalized communications – actual phone calls, handwritten notes, and actual signatures on letters.

Sounds like the paper and pen factories better not close up shop just yet.  To what can we attribute this appetite for an “old school” approach to communication?  Here’s a few suggestions.  I’d like to hear yours in the comment section.

  • Face to face communication and note writing never really left.  They were drowned out by the never-ending buzz of social media.
  • High school students want you to bend over backwards for them, and they’ll test you to find out how far you’ll bend.
  • It’s about standing out among the noise.  10 years ago, standing out meant going with social media.  Now that everyone’s caught up there, it’s face to face communication and hand-written notes that make you stand out
  • Millennials value community much more than their parents do.

Let me read your suggestions.  And while you’re at it, here’s your coaching assignment.  Ask a 20-something, “What kind of impression does it make on you when someone takes the time to write a note or meet you in person?”